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TPG's 80 Other Books Every Man Should Read (limit 2/poster)

by Buck Mulligan, Martello Tower, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:10

Rules:

Forget poetry and plays - they're worthy of separate lists.

The Bible is implied - it's like naming Jesus, Lincoln and Rockne to the first three slots at your fantasy dinner table. No need to voice the obvious.

Any books not on the Esquire list.

Tags:
books

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Weird: A Confederacy of Dunces but not The Moviegoer?

by Grantland @, y'allywood, Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 08:57 @ Buck Mulligan

Winters Tale but not Solider of Great War?

When I read the title of this thread my first thought was "Old Man and the Sea."

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A Distant Mirror by Barbara Tuchman

by nedhead, Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 07:59 @ Buck Mulligan

I read it a few years ago, and was stunned that my grandma (long since deceased) had a copy and read it. And now I see that Ta-Nehisi Coates is reading it.

Ta-Nehisi Coates and and my grandma can't be wrong! Seriously, it's a classic and amazing book for history buffs.

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2015/07/ta_nehisi_coates_the_between_the_...

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anything by Bill Bryson

by Pat, Right behind you, Friday, July 10, 2015, 20:20 @ Buck Mulligan

Let's go with A Short History of Nearly Everything.

Sticking with non-fiction, do yourself a favor and get this one.

Blind Man's Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage

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They're making A Walk In The Woods into a movie!

by NDTerp, I am not Jay. I never have been Jay., Saturday, July 11, 2015, 05:38 @ Pat

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I'm in

by scriptcomesfirst @, Saturday, July 11, 2015, 07:55 @ NDTerp

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Death Comes for the Archbishop and The Guns of August

by Flann, Central New Jersey, Friday, July 10, 2015, 19:52 @ Buck Mulligan

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Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

by fightinamish ⌂ @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 18:28 @ Buck Mulligan

It's a five book set, sure, but you can get it in a single bounded volume — so I'd say it counts as one big long book.

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Absolutely, though the last book is a real downer

by KelleyCook @, quite pleased with Nov 8th, Friday, July 10, 2015, 19:46 @ fightinamish

In an interview shortly before he died, he was asked about it and he said that his had wife left him, he got depressed and wrote a horribly depressing book.

He also said he probably would revisit the series to fix that soon.

Of course that never happened.

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providing less clarification since 1991

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Doesn't the 5th book contain the story about the

by Jeff (BGS), A starter home in suburban Tempe, Friday, July 10, 2015, 20:27 @ KelleyCook

biscuits (cookies) in the train station? One of my all time favorite stories. I think it actually happened to Adams.

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At night, the ice weasels come.

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In the historical category ...

by Mark, Cloud City, Friday, July 10, 2015, 17:54 @ Buck Mulligan

I prefer business history books. Its good to know how stupid or how ruthless your fellow man can be.

- Barbarians at the Gate ... (essentially a history of leveraged buyouts & takeovers)
- Den of Thieves ........... (essentially a history of the junk bond market)

I could list about 15 others that are similar in vane. It made for great conversations with my professors when getting my graduate degree. Too bad my classmates were all clueless, having next to zero knowledge about the history of the industries they were studying.

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"After more than a decade of sub-par red zone TD efficiency... wait ... what? ... Hold on!"

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My Struggle; The Master and Margarita

by ndbk32 @, Los Angeles, Friday, July 10, 2015, 15:57 @ Buck Mulligan

No, not Mein Kampf. I'm talking about Karl Ove Knausgaard's 6-volume epic autobiographical novel. It's very Proustian. Or so I've been told, since I've never actually read any Proust. But it makes me want to read Proust. So there's that.

I'm only on Volume 2, but I think it's excellent.

And The Master and Margarita is by Mikhail Bulgakov

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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance & The Moral Animal

by Jeff (BGS), A starter home in suburban Tempe, Friday, July 10, 2015, 13:38 @ Buck Mulligan

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At night, the ice weasels come.

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"We Were Soldiers Once... And Young" & "Fearless"

by scriptcomesfirst @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 12:52 @ Buck Mulligan

One an older selection and one just a couple years old. Both have themes of courage and sacrifice, but the former illustrates the brotherhood of soldiers as well as anything ever put to page, while the latter is one of the best redemption stories I have ever read.

Also, I cried - an ugly, snot-filled cry - reading the appendixes to each book.

Also Part II: three of the soldiers in "We Were Soldiers..." served with my father pre-war and I heard stories about them prior to reading the book. My dad did not even know they were in there until I told him.

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Have you read

by hobbs, San Diego, Friday, July 10, 2015, 13:42 @ scriptcomesfirst

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa by E.B. Sledge?

It is perhaps the best first person account of war and the brotherhood of men in combat.

I rather suspect that you have read it.

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Yessir. I'm partial to WWS because of the personal

by scriptcomesfirst @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 14:40 @ hobbs

Connection of my parents. One of the soldiers used to babysit my sister in Germany. He died in VN but after the events of the book.

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"The Dwarf " Pars Lagerkvist, "Studs Lonigan" James T.

by Frank, Friday, July 10, 2015, 13:23 @ scriptcomesfirst

Farrell

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The Last Good Kiss and Lord Jim

by Romulox, Friday, July 10, 2015, 12:39 @ Buck Mulligan

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Crumley belongs in the top 80.

by Buck Mulligan, Martello Tower, Friday, July 10, 2015, 15:50 @ Romulox

LGK is a great pick.

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Trout Madness and On the Road

by JRT, Island of Misfit Toys, Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:38 @ Buck Mulligan

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On the Road should be standard issue for teenage boys

by HCE, Friday, July 10, 2015, 16:31 @ JRT

We should hand it out at bar mitzvahs and confirmations--if I can remember this post in twelve years, that's exactly what I'll give my son for his. Maybe throw in Cat's Cradle, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and Howl and Other Poems, too-- also essential reading for teens.

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True Detective

by Mike (bart), Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:37 @ Buck Mulligan

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God, Country, Notre Dame. The Swiss Family Robinson.

by BillyGoat, At Thanksgiving with Joe Bethersontin, Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:14 @ Buck Mulligan

The former would be an awesome history of 20th Century U.S. Catholicism, even if it had nothing to do with ND.

The latter is a classic and is my personal preference over Robinson Crusoe and other books of that era.

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Endurance

by Jay ⌂, San Diego, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:50 @ Buck Mulligan

It's the #1 book in the Amazon category of "Winter Sports", which is pretty funny.

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Primo Levi "The Drowned and the Saved".....

by MTIrish, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:48 @ Buck Mulligan

Franklin Foer "How Soccer Explains the World"

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Gilead- Marilynne Robinson; Book of the New Sun- Gene Wolfe

by PAK, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:58 @ Buck Mulligan

Gilead is written by a woman but is a great book for mediating on men, fathers, and children. The book has a peaceful quality and I think has a lot to say but isn't overbearing in how it gets to the point. It has a lot of religious themes (the main character is a pastor) but you don't need to be religious to take a lot from the experience of reading it. The prose is some of the best I've ever read; simple yet beautiful.

The Book of the New Sun is probably the best piece of literature that the sci-fi genre has produced. Beautiful prose, deep symbolism and meaning, transparent enough to enjoy on a first read but opaque enough to encourage and reward a second, third, or fourth read. I cheated a bit, because it was originally published as a 4 book series, but it's been re-released as a 2 book trade paperback and isn't even really that long in that format.

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Just read Gilead again. So beautiful.

by Slainte Joe, Raleigh, Friday, July 10, 2015, 12:46 @ PAK

I'm reading Home now, which is just as good so far. I can think of few characters who evoke my sympathy like Jack Boughton.

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East of Eden, Vietnam (by Karnow)

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:39 @ Buck Mulligan

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Did you mention "Tinkers" yesterday?

by HullieAndMikes, Joe Turner's bookcase, ALHS, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:48 @ Kevin

I hadn't released that Paul Harding had released a followup until I stumbled across "Enon" earlier this year. That's the sort of book that should come with a trigger warning for parents; just a heartbreaking story about a guy going to pieces after his teenage daughter dies in an accident.

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Yes -- Tinkers is excellent.

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:53 @ HullieAndMikes

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Sand County Almanac (Leopold), Fortress of Solitude (Lethem)

by JD in Portland ⌂, Portland OR, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:07 @ Buck Mulligan

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great call on Sand County almanac

by Mike (bart), Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:23 @ JD in Portland

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The Count of Monte Cristo, The Last Lion

by Brian, 72 Whooping Cough Lane, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:59 @ Buck Mulligan

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action/adventure category

by Mike (bart), Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:55 @ Buck Mulligan

The Last Expedition: Journal of RF Scott

Moby Dick

Others:

Gallipoli, by Alan Moorehead


Roinson Crusoe

The Great War by Peter Hart

Lonesome Dove

Call of the Wild/The Sea Wolf (some Jack London something or other)

War of the Worlds

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Catch 22, Crime and Punishment

by irishvol @, Music City, USA, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:52 @ Buck Mulligan

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Am I the only person

by Dylan, Santa Barbara, CA, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:55 @ irishvol

who hates, hates, hates Catch-22? Ugh, the glib, goofy rat-a-tat style wore me out after 20 pages.

Years after I put it down, I was cruising past TCM and they were teeing up Sex and the Single Girl. "Great timing!", I thought, since i'd heard it was one of those classic 60's comedies, which are fun, at least anthropologically speaking.

Two minutes into that opening scene I'd have bet my house it was written by Joseph Heller, and sure enough...

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I couldn't get through it.

by BillyGoat, At Thanksgiving with Joe Bethersontin, Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:15 @ Dylan

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also hated it

by Mike (bart), Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:26 @ Dylan

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I don't hate it as much as Portnoy's Complaint or Updike

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:06 @ Dylan

But I don't like it.

I still can't believe Roth wrote American Pastoral. That's like Irish Joe doing a Czarobski post, on purpose.

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I couldn't stand American Pastoral

by HullieAndMikes, Joe Turner's bookcase, ALHS, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:15 @ Kevin

I read it while studying abroad in Ireland (taking an American literature course there was kind of funny). Just felt really hackneyed and unbelievable, but that may have just been me reading something at the wrong time in my life.

I've always liked Updike, though. I like "On the Farm" better than "Rabbit Run," although Rabbit has some beautiful writing about basketball.

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I am a sucker for the epic novel

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:20 @ HullieAndMikes

Kavalier and Clay, Empire Falls, Freedom, etc. That's probably why I put East of Eden in my response.

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Water Music by TC Boyle. You, Slainte and Bart among

by Buck Mulligan, Martello Tower, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:32 @ Kevin

others would enjoy that, I'd wager, if you haven't already.

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I'll check it out -- thanks.

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:45 @ Buck Mulligan

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I almost put in East of Eden, too

by Dylan, Santa Barbara, CA, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:27 @ Kevin

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I like Kavalier and Klay and most of Empire Falls

by HullieAndMikes, Joe Turner's bookcase, ALHS, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:27 @ Kevin

But the denouement in Empire Falls, much like the similar thing in Owen Meany, just rings false to me.

I think Plainsong toed a more successful line between epic and small scale.

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I like Haruf a lot.

by Kevin @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:28 @ HullieAndMikes

Both Benediction and Plainsong are really good.

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The Baroque Cycle & Red Storm Rising

by KelleyCook @, quite pleased with Nov 8th, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:48 @ Buck Mulligan

Neal Stephenson & Tom Clancy (way before he branded out his name)

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providing less clarification since 1991

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Frankenstein, Animal Farm

by Dylan, Santa Barbara, CA, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:43 @ Buck Mulligan

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Manchester, American Caesar; Sheen, Life of Christ.

by Madtown @, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:42 @ Buck Mulligan

Life of Christ might violate the spirit of the (Bible) constraints, but no really it'll rock your world.

2d to American Caesar could be first two volumes of Manchester's Last Lion re Churchill.

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Max Brooks - World War Z; Dumas - The Count of Monte Cristo

by NDTerp, I am not Jay. I never have been Jay., Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:41 @ Buck Mulligan

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Oh The Places You'll Go and Calvin & Hobbes

by JN @, Seattle, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:38 @ Buck Mulligan

oh I thought this was books every man should read to their son. My bad.

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Calvin and Hobbes is great for all ages

by CK08, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:41 @ JN

and, like Thomas Jefferson and Winston Churchill, can be quoted in support of almost any position.

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^ This is the proper answer. ^

by hobbs, San Diego, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:51 @ CK08

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The Disaster Artist.

by Ken Fowler, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:37 @ Buck Mulligan

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Screw your manly rules, Buck.

by Slainte Joe, Raleigh, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:36 @ Buck Mulligan
edited by Slainte Joe, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:41

Philip Larkin, The Complete Poems

George Orwell, Collected Essays

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Yeats, B. H. Fairchild for poems

by Buck Mulligan, Martello Tower, Friday, July 10, 2015, 09:52 @ Slainte Joe

You may enjoy the works of my HS teammate Todd Davis, who is a wonderful poet. And not feminized.

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1776 and War, what is it good for?

by Bingo @, Fort Wayne, IN, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:36 @ Buck Mulligan

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I like 1491 for this list more than 1776.

by PAK, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:02 @ Bingo

1776 is an excellent book but it's treading well-worn ground; everyone learns at least SOMETHING about the revolution in school.

On the other hand, 1491 opens up a lot of new perspectives often ignored in schools - native populations, humanity's impact on the world, agriculture, etc.

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Thanks for the suggestion.

by Bingo @, Fort Wayne, IN, Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:14 @ PAK

I think what I love about 1776 is that while we hear most of the material in the book from schooling, the ability to go through the year moment to moment gave me more of an appreciation of just how impossible it was. It's also a brilliant message on leadership.

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It is a great book. It told a lot of stories I hadn't heard.

by PAK, Friday, July 10, 2015, 11:34 @ Bingo

McCollough is a terrific writer, but he's also a little heavy on the 'great man' perspective of history, which makes for great storytelling but also provides a pretty narrow perspective.

My point is, if we're making a list of essentials I'd lean towards including a different perspective on history that a lot of people don't consider, rather than one that simply reinforces one they already get in spades in the classroom.

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American Caesar & The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

by hobbs, San Diego, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:31 @ Buck Mulligan
edited by hobbs, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:38

By William Manchester and William Shirer.

Honorable mention for Shelby Foote's Civil war trilogy.

Yeah I'm kinda a geek for history books. Its basically all I read.

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The Stand, Stephen King; Breaks of the Game, Halberstam

by Jim (fisherj08) @, A Samoan kid's laptop, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:31 @ Buck Mulligan

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Helprin: A Soldier of the Great War; McMurtry: Lonesome Dove

by Bill, Southern California, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:24 @ Buck Mulligan

and I'll cheat a bit by expanding that to the entire Lonesome Dove Saga.

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Lonesome Dove was on the original list

by MattG, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:25 @ Bill

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Scratch Dove then. Add John Irving: A Prayer for Owen Meany

by Bill, Southern California, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:32 @ MattG

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Gatsby, To Kill A Mockingbird

by MattG, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:22 @ Buck Mulligan

Also The Sun Also Rises.

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A Death in the Family by James Agee

by HullieAndMikes, Joe Turner's bookcase, ALHS, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:19 @ Buck Mulligan

and The Coldest Winter by David Halberstam

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Percy: The Moviegoer; Cooper: Last of the Mohicans

by PMan, The Banks of the Spokane River, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:18 @ Buck Mulligan

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Ulysses; Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!

by HCE, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:15 @ Buck Mulligan

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1. Infinite Jest by DFW and 2. The Razor's Edge by Maugham

by Buck Mulligan, Martello Tower, Friday, July 10, 2015, 08:11 @ Buck Mulligan

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I can't be the only one who hated "Infinite Jest"

by KelleyCook @, quite pleased with Nov 8th, Friday, July 10, 2015, 10:21 @ Buck Mulligan

The author uses over a thousand pages to follow a few dozen characters espousing wisdom on half dozen or so seemingly unrelated topics (drugs, tennis, feral animals, suicide, filmmaking, drugs, Québécois, etc.) ... and here is the real jest ... that never actually tie back into together as the narrative in the book just stops.

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providing less clarification since 1991

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